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the coaches and even leaks because many of the links i work with our code. they are not governed by u.s.a. football for pop warner. these guys can't come down. scott can't come until every coach in the united states of america this is the way you need to do it. so what we try to do at the league had to share this as an example that this is what you're fighting with the aggressors level is number one, coach kerri campbell and i went to a lake. we said this. you know i want to do? we played at the highest level, so there is a model standard. authority out there. the nfl authority set a standard for youth coaches in america. the problem is they don't embrace the changes because it's all about winning. win at all costs mentality. winning is good, but nobody remembers years from now. what matters is the effects of the game. so what we tried to do was, okay, if you guys want to improve safety and you want to improve coming you know, making sure coaches are responsiblefor me being accountable and credible, then implement the leagues are just like the nfl pa. they protect the west players. they
the negotiations. she did not meet with hamas leaders because the u.s. does not deal directly with the militant group. so gint acted as a go-between. today, second clinton announced they had a deal. >> the united states will with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> tonight, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu says he will consider more severe military action if the cease-fire does not last. we have team fox coverage. david lee miller live inside southern israel but first to steve harrigan. he is live tonight in caro. what are the terms of the deal exactly? >> trace, three basic points coming out of this cease-fire agreement. first a cessation of hostilities on all sides. for israel that means they will no longer target members of hamas. for hamas it means they will no longer fire rockets into israel. second. a cooling off period of 24 hours. this will be a closely watch period to see whether this 8 days of violence has actually stopped. and finally the most controversial part, an
minister and the u.s. secretary of state. the truce calls for an immediate halt to the fighting and reportedly aims to work towards a longer-term solution as well. >> the latest escalation in violence began just over a week ago. since then, some 140 palestinians and five israelis have been killed in air strikes and rocket attacks. >> we will be trying to go live to cairo and also to gauze in a moment, but first, let's get back to evens earlier in it -- earlier in the day that threatens to derail the talks -- we will be trying to go live to cairo and also to gaza in a moment. >> panic on the streets of televisa. ambulances rushed to the scene of the explosion. -- panic on the streets of tel aviv. the bus was burned out but not torn apart, suggesting it may have been a relatively small bomb. israel is calling this a orist attack. >> hamas is a murderous organization, an organization that calls for israel's destruction. anyone who negotiates with them and the prime minister's holding talks with the americans, should know who sits there in gaza, and the need to hit them in those sam
protect u.s. personnel. >> the president has been skipping his daily intelligence briefings. >> with respect to iran i want to see a diplomatic resolution to the problem. >> the president's iran policy lacks credibility. the question is whether or not is whether the defense budget is big enough to deal with the major crisis and potential challenges around the world. >> as far as the middle east is concerned, his national policy has been abysmal failure. >> the arrogance and dishonesty is breathtaking. >> there is a circle the wagon operation around barack obama that nobody is going to penetrate. >> very close con tackle with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. >> are we better off in the middle east now than we were four years ago? absolutely not. why? because the policies of the administration and the way its been handling itself. >> when a president of the united states apologizes to religious fan
reaffirmed egypt's commitment to the palestinian cause and a need for just resolution. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton helped negotiate the deal. she promised to work with partners in the region. the israeli military killed about 160 palestinians during the conflict. palestinian militants fired rockets from the gaza strip that killed five israelis. prime minister netanyahu said the right thing is to reach a lasting cease-fire but he warned of a wider military operation if security was threatened. hamas leader mashau warned his forces would resume attacks if israel broke the truce. >>> people in jerusalem are wondering if the cease-fire will hold. cohey sue gee has covered the middle east for years. he was in gaza on the first day of the offensive. kohei, why did the two sides agree to this truce? >> reporter: well, thousands of rockets have been fired since israeli forces withdrew from gaza in 2005. the israelis seemed to have come to the conclusion that they succeed the in reducing the ability of hamas to attack. and i think the influence of the u.s. contributed to bringing a
a favorable external environment, meaning u.s. not going into this deep due to the fiscal cliff. and also signs of improvement in asia. >> meanwhile the french pmi says the survey there suggests a 0.7% gdp drop in quarter 4 for france. >> that seems quite large. we've seen in recent quarters numbers out of front which were higher than suggested by the pmis, however, they then revised down q2. so i'm looking for a contraction of 0.3 in france quarter on quarter in q4. >> what's going to change things, ricardo, what will turn things around? >> i think on the policy front, not much one can effect. fiscal policy will remain tight next year. the ecb doesn't have a huge margin to ease policy. i'm expecting that they will cut the refinancing rate. but i don't think it will go to negative rates for now. so they can only do perhaps 25 basis points on the main refinancing rate. the omt bond buying facility can only be activated if one of the countries apply. and it doesn't look like neither spain nor italy will apply anytime soon. and anyway the bond yields have declined quite a bit compared to jul
the mosque. that is considered a terrorist organization by the u.s. government, of course. >> i want to thank president morsi for his leadership in ending the violent, this is a critical moment for the region. egypt a new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stabilitiy it peace. lou: the ceasefire hours after a bomb tow through a bus in israel's defense ministry in tel aviv, it injured at least 2 dozen people, hamas leaders praised the attack but did not take out right responsibility. a damascus based group with ties to the west bank took credit. the israeli government confirmed this is only the first stage of a ceasefire agreement work many questions remain stock answered. a second set of negotiations reportedly to begin within the next 24 hours, israel's blockade of the gaza border, and an end to the flow of arms in to gaza to be negotiated. but perhaps, a bigger question, did secretary of state, hillary clinton, simply rubber-stamp an agreement that has already been negotiated. we take all of this up here tonight
and rocket fire killed more than 160 palestinians and 5 israelis. >>> the u.s. ambassador to the united nations is used to defending her country's foreign policy decisions. now susan rice has broken her silence to defend herself. rice is considered a candidate for secretary of state. but she's faced scrutiny because of comments she made following the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. rice made a tv appearance immediately after the september 11 attack. she suggested protests in benghazi over a u.s.-made name mocked the prophet mohammed triggered the assault on the consulate. but investigators later determined it was likely a premeditated plot by extremists with links to al qaeda. the attackers killed the u.s. ambassador and three other americans. rice broke her silence wednesday in response to rising criticism from members of the republican party. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. and that our investigations would give us the definitive answers. >> repub
of these people once again take cover in their homes? will the celebrations end and the fear return? for u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton and mohammed morsi who pushed for a cease fire, the agreement calls for discussion of a number of issues, including freedom of movement for palestinians in and out of gaza. and the agreement not to target the area in gaza, and to halt rocket fire into israel. again, a discussion, nothing is a done deal. over the next hour we'll look at the negotiations still happening now. we'll also hear from the spokeswoman for the israeli defense forces and from the leader of hamas. plus our reporters on the ground and a whole lot more. we begin with a look at what has transpired over just the last 24 hours. it is remarkable there was a cease-fire this hour, when you consider how this wednesday started off. take a look. add midday, no sign of a truce yet when a city bus is bombed in tel-aviv. at least two dozen were wounded. israeli police say terrorists left two bombs on the bus and fled. only one exploded. hamas praised the attack near the headquarters of the i
it was the other side of the mountain. during the time my parents were gone, working here in the u.s. i will look at the mountain something i parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. that was what it meant to me. >> where did you grow up? originally where were u born. >> in mexico. southern mexico in the little city that nobody has heard of. why mention ak acapulco everybody knows that. it was three hours away from there. >> when did your parents come to the united states? how would were you? >> my father came here in 1977 when i was two years old. and he sent for my mother a few years later. my mother came here in 1980 when was four and a half. >> when did you come to the united states? >> i came to the united states in 1985. >> how would were you? >> in may of 1985, i was nine and a half going on fen. >> what can you tell us about coming to the united states. what was your trek? >> well, i had been separated from my father for eight years. so when he returned to mexico in '85, my siblings and i convinced us to bring us back here. he wasn't going come back to mexico. he didn't
to war, the global impact will be felt here in the u.s. joining me now in a fox business exclusive is senior advisor to the mayor, thank you for being with us. i want to get right to it. a cease-fire is good news but what is your take on it? >> is quite interesting because since the cease-fire was signed, several rockets were launched after the cease-fire came into effect. things have been pretty quiet and we hope it continues this way. melissa: do you feel that they violated it already? >> i guess you could call it that. we are dealing with band of terrorists whose political ideologies to kill as many as thewecan. we have to take it with a grain of salt. we want the southern border to be peaceful and that is why we signed the cease-fire with them and we hope they stand up to the terms they agreed to. melissa: israel agreed to stop all hostilities and not target specific individuals. palestinians said they would stop against israel including rocket attacks and along the border. obviously this question about that, but does it seem fair to you? >> let's put it thisway. our goal is to
. >> an american team of top experts arrived shortly after the disaster, but they were largely stuck at the u.s. embassy. the japanese didn't think they needed the help. but the emergency was out of control, and the u.s. gave the japanese an ominous private warning. >> that if, you know, we don't expand the efforts, we'll require heroic work done that could be, you know, quite devastating for the workers. >> what do we mean by that? >> that means they could very well lose their lives. >> an official with the u.s. government told the japanese that "your people are gonna have to die save that plant unless you let us help you." >> yes. >> at one point during the week, the hazard was so great, the japanese took all but about 70 workers out of the plant. their problem is water. the systems that keep the radioactive fuel rods cool failed. the rods are partially melting, releasing radiation. and it's not just the reactors. there are also used fuel rods, essentially nuclear waste, stored in pools nearby. they're also losing water, and american experts fear that one of these pools is already dry. neshei
of diplomacy involving the u.n. secretary general and the secretary general -- and the u.s. secretary of state. from gaza, jeremy bowen reports. a warning, you might find some of these images distressing. >> because i came back to life after the cease-fire began. -- gaza came back to life after the cease-fire began. coming to another israeli bombing campaign felt like another victory. this was the hamas interior ministry. governing with or without a cease-fire will be harder with the main administrative center ron. in jerusalem tonight, is real hint that more military action if the new cease-fire does not hold. >> i know there are citizens expecting a more severe military action, and perhaps we will need to do so but at this time, the right thing for the state of israel is to use this opportunity to achieve a lasting cease-fire. >> an attack on a bus in tel aviv was praised by hamas, but not claimed by them. both sides wanted this deal. all this, and rockets hit in the city from gaza and has dented a sense of security. a ceasefire will not necessarily bring israel could not have kept them from
boosted his credibility with u.s. and israel, and has become a politician to deal with in the arab world but it is one thing to broker a cease-fire, now he will have to enforce it and crack down on hamas and their weapons smuggling >> reporter: president obama who visited israel as a candidate four years ago but not since has to decide his next steps. >> the first thing he has to do is decide whether or not he is going to invest in the effort to resolve the israeli-palestinian conflict. i think at the moment it is a stain on his legacy. >> reporter: the u.s. officials are looking at what could be the birth of a new start with the less clear is how the u.s. will handle hamas, which is clearly empowered >>> and now, how all of this is playing out in israel and gaza, nbc's veteran middle east correspondent martin fletcher is in tel aviv tonight. and our chief foreign correspondent, richard engel is in gaza city, let's begin with you, richard. >> reporter: good evening, kate, israeli drones are still in the sky here, but for the first time no air strikes. and hamas is considering this a majo
. >> reporter: just this clear, the u.s. has given over $3 billion to israel to help promote peace. with the conflict never ending, i asked if american money is going to waste. >> america is investing in maintaining the peace in the region and also the american interests in the region. >> reporter: the u.s. has given money albeit much less, almost $200 million to the palestinians. about you that money only goes to the palestinian authority in the west bank, and not to gaza. >>> tonight, the woman who has taken a lot of heat in the aftermath of the benghazi attack spoke directly to her critics. for weeks, un ambassador susan rice has been attacked by john mccain for participating in what he describes as a cover-up. >> the president and this administration has either been guilty of colossal incompetence or engaged in a cover-up. >> mccain says rice made misleading comments in the days immediately following the benghazi attack. rice is being considered for secretary of state, and some republican senators have vowed to block that nomination. today she spoke publicly about the controver
. >>> and all that matters. >> u.s. troops serving our country are being served thanksgiving dinner. >> thousands of miles away on "cbs this morning." >> from kabul, afghanistan -- happy thanksgiving! captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning" on this thanksgiving day. happy thanksgiving. norah o'donnell is off. we are waking up to good news out of the middle east. for the first time in more than a week the cease fire between israel and hamas held overnight and continues to hold at this hour. >> people in gaza and southern israel are leaving shelters and returning home after that week of air attacks across the border. hamas and its supporters inside gaza are claiming victory. charlie d'agata is in gaza city this morning. >> reporter: it's like being on a different planet in gaza city whole world away from what this place was like 24 hours ago. people are smiling, congratulating one another. we had to fight through traffic for the first time. and for the first time people here got a good night's sleep and woke up without the worry of israeli
visits and predicts sales will jump 18% this year. adobe says u.s. on line sales start to peak today but really pick up on monday, when people go back to work and shop during their lunch breaks. and december 17th is expected to be especially strong when thousands of merchants offer free shopping on line with a guaranteed delivery by christmas eve. >>> thousands of people flooded bay area grocery stores this morning for last minute thanksgiving food shopping. at a safeway store in san francisco we caught up with procrastinators scrambling around. many said their turkeys were in the oven but needed other items. >> nothing like waiting to the last minute. right? >> yeah. >> no, no, no, i have my long list ready so i prepared for this. >> where is your turkey? >> it is right at home, it is ready now. >> okay, so now these are all the trimmings? >> yes, yeah, that is the last minute. >> others said they preordered turkey meals so they would not have to mess up their kitchen too much this holiday. >> did you not feel like cooking? >> well, it is hassle to cook a turkey, yeah so, that is wh
and then get delayed there because of the fog here. >> reporter: the fact the u.s. bureau of transportation statistics ranks sfo's on-tame departure rate 28th among the nation's 29 major airports. travelers know bad weather at sfo can make for a long day. >> i've seen much more weather delays at sfo. i haven't seen as many in oakland. >> you avoed them because of that? >> i avoid sfo because of that. >> reporter: so far 85% of oakland airport's departures were on time. sfo just 75%. an on-time departure rate of 90% but far fewer weather delays than its neighbor to the north. >> the city sometimes for sure but here not the case, yeah. >> reporter: and despite long lines today sacramento airport has an 87% on time departure rate this year. of course proximity and convenience much louder than reputation and even statistics. >> san jose is very close to me so my work is here. it's within a ten minutes' drive. >> i stop over here. >> reporter: and so with a long memory of delays, travelers showed up at sfo early today ready to brave the crowds and delays only to find out there weren't many. >> m
, will the celebrations ends and the fear return? for u.s. secretary of state hilary clinton and president morsi, the hope is that the deal will stick. it calls for freedom of movement for palestinians in and out of gaza and a commitment not to target militants and commitment from militant groups in gaza, to halt rocket fire into israel. again, a discussion nothing is a done deal. over the next hour, we'll look at negotiations still happening now, we'll also hear from the spokeswoman for the israeli defense forces and the leader much hamas. plus, a reporter on the ground and whole lot more. we begin with a look at what has transpired over the last 24 hours, and it's remarkable there is a cease-fire at this hour when you consider how this wednesday started off. take a look. at mid day, no sign of a truce when a city bus is bombed in tell aviv, two dozen people twounded. terrorists left two bombs on the bus and fled. only one exploded. hamas praised attack, near the headquarters of the israeli defense forces. farther south, an israeli home hit by a rocket. room after room, left in ruins. according to the is
's wrong with that? [ticking] >> when the u.s. oil companies came here in the '40s and '50s, the americans moved into the area with their families and developed it to suit their tastes and their way of life. they created a replica of american suburbia. today you could be in the outskirts of houston or los angeles. it's almost like it's an enclave within saudi arabia. it's--different from the rest of the country. >> yes, that's true, because-- >> very different. it kept a lot of the american ways. >> yes, of course. >> but blocked off from the rest. >> they are good ways. there's nothing wrong with it. these were their excellent ways. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm morley safer. in this edition, we follow the flow of big oil from massive, mega billion dollar oil fields in saudi arabia to the u.s. where wall street refines the oil into a mega billion dollar commodity. we begin with a look back to 2008 when the price of oil, theoretically tied to supply and demand, suddenly became untethered. storage tanks were full, yet the price skyrocketed from $69 a barrel to nearly $150 before it
and if they had met previously. woman replied they had pat asked about the stay in the u.s. and inquired what she was doing in the hall way. the woman explained she was returning to indian why in a few days and hoped to glimpse of the president. pat arranged to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the previous engagement. i used the story to begin the talk because i think it brings to light a couple of key points i wish to bring to light about pat nixon and her public role and the role of foreign diplomat. pat met the woman during her travel as second lead. the traveling she did as first and second lead was the past of the job as a political wife. second, this woman was not the wife a ambassador or statesman, she was just a young woman who had come to the united states come out first to see the second lead and come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact on the travels to important people. she treated everyone she met as if they were the most important person in the world. the people
, the local police, and the u.s. attorney's office simply want this case to be closed. but is it? tonight, you decide. did the fbi catch all the suspects? did the fbi let one of them walk? and did the fbi make a mistake putting blame on a pizza delivery man whose secrets blew up in a parking lot? it was a hot thursday afternoon. jane hyde was expecting to see her brother at a party that night, but she had one errand to run. a quick shopping trip on erie's peach street. but there was trouble. police had blocked the road. cops and cars everywhere. she turned around and went home. it was only later that night, watching the 10:00 news, she learned what that traffic was all about. >> my kids are sitting on the couch and then the story airs of a bank robbery and a man came in to the bank with a bomb on him. >> you are recognizing your brother? >> my brother sitting there with this bomb on him. i'm thinking, okay, the police have him. they'll find out who did this to him. then as it goes on, it's like -- brian exploded. you know, the bomb went off. brian's dead. i'm like, i can't believe this. >> aft
, he will join us in just a couple of minutes. >> meanwhile, a trio of u.s. warships sent to the eastern mediterranean area just in case americans need to be evacuated out of israel. the ships were due to return to norfolk, virginia, but their homecoming will be a bit delayed by at least several days. reports say these ships would not play a combat role and would only be used to help americans in that area. they can also serve as floating hospitals if need be. >>> susan rice now breaking her silence and defending her comments on the benghazi terror attacks just days after the raid on the u.s. consulate which ended with the murder of our ambassador to libya and three other americans. ambassador rice went on all five sunday shows and said the attack grew out of a spontaneous protest over an anti-muslim film. now rice is saying those remarks were based on intelligence she was given. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live in washington with the latest for us. who is ambassador rice saying gave her those talking points? >> good morning. she's not saying specif
as lead council on the non-discrimination act for the u.s. house of representatives. thank you for your time. >> thank you. [ boy 1 ] hey! that's the last crescent. oh, did you want it? yea we'll split it. [ female announcer ] made fresh, so light buttery and flakey. that's half that's not half! guys, i have more! thanks mom [ female announcer ] pillsbury crescents. let the making begin the saying easy as pie? i get it now. just unroll it fill, top, bake, and present. that must have taken you forever! it was really tough. [ female announcer ] pillsbury pie crust. let the making begin >> eliot: a culmination of years of what might be called a new kind of warfare. the strike by seal team six was made possible by intelligence gathering in high tech and new age. it's a war in which there are no clear battle lines no uniforms, often no distinction between soldier and civilian, and where the ethics of old may not apply. joining me now national correspondent mark bowden, author of "the finish." thank you for joining us tonight. >> thank you eliot. >> eliot: you begin the
>>> and susan rice is speaking out and defending herself after those statements she had after the u.s. consulate attack in benghazi. >>> plus, a turkey day tradition. the macy's day parade stepping off in a matter two of hours from now in new york. we're live on the streets amid all the holiday thanksgiving. >> it's november 22nd, thanksgiving day. a special edition of "starting point" begins right now. >>> good morning, everybody. happy thanksgiving. our "starting point," the cease-fire in israel and gaza is holding. in gaza city, where so much blood spilled over the last eight days, palestinians are celebrating in the streets. israel and hamas agreeing to halt all acts of aggression against each other. >> this cease-fire deal brokered largely over the phone. president obama and the president of egypt, mohamed morsi, apparently making a real connection to stop the carnage. i want to begin our coverage here of the very fragile truce with arwa damon live with us this morning in gaza city. arwa, i think i hear horns honking. is the celebration there continuing where you are? >> reporter
been left behind who later come to the u.s. to be reunited with their parents and we don't talk about how immigration breaks out families and and, you know, it takes a toll on the whole family. so this is one of the reasons why i wanted to write about this because, you know, it's something that is -- it's an experience that definitely scared me, that has really shaped the woman i am today, and then also it's an experience that i think right now with the dreamers, you know, with the young undocumented people who are fighting to get their legal status, i felt it was an important story in terms of giving people an inside to what their situation might be like and i touch upon the fact that, you know, my family benefited from the amnesty of 1980, i had a green card by the time i was 14. so the moment i got my green card, you know, the whole world just opened up to me and there were so many possibilities that came my way that i was able to jump on because i had a green card. and i would really love to see this happen to the dreamers, you know, for us to give them that chance to pursue
to the democrats. but the competitive u.s. senate race for republican jon kyl's old seat, that seat stayed republican. and yes, the county sheriff who did the whole taxpayer-funded stunt about having his cold case posse uncover the fraud of president obama's birth certificate, that sheriff did get re-elected, barely. last time he won by a 13-point landslide. this time he won by much less than that, but did get re-elected. and that public publicity-hungry arizona sheriff is not the only arizona official who has lately been fixated on the president's birth certificate. the arizona secretary of state this year threatened to keep president obama off the ballot in arizona for this year's election. because, you know, kenya, or whatever. and because that is the record of arizona's secretary of state, the state's current top elections official, i think nobody had very high expectations for him in terms of how well he would do running elections in the state of arizona. and indeed, the arizona elections this year went horribly. and it took them 14 days to even come up with the results. but they do h
and most violent godfathers, known to u.s. law enforcement as the john gotti of japan. but there was one thing goto's power and money couldn't buy him in his homeland. he had liver disease and desperately needed a transplant. culturally, the japanese don't believe in organ donation, so to get a new liver, he needed to come to the u.s. for a yakuza, that should have been a problem, says mike cox. he was the chief of immigration and customs at the u.s. embassy in tokyo. >> we want to be a welcoming country in the united states, but certainly, we don't want the yakuza coming to the united states. >> because they're criminals? >> they have extensive criminal histories here in japan. they are members of criminal organizations. for both of those reasons, they would be ineligible to enter the united states. >> how did he get around that? according to jake adelstein's reporting, which we confirmed, tadamasa goto made a deal with the fbi. he offered to become a rat and inform on his yakuza brothers. >> goto said, "here's the deal. i need to get in the united states to get my liver transplant, or
, thanks so much. >>> a man who advised six u.s. secretaries of state on the middle east says there is only one winner in this conflict, and that is hamas. aaron david miller, author and long-time diplomatic policymaker joining me from cleveland, ohio. good to see you. >> pleasure to be here, fredricka. >> why is this, the feeling that hamas comes out in better shape than israel? even hamas feels that way. >> well, i think it's a toss-up here. there are two clear winners. hamas for sure. you've witnessed a parade of arab officials literally visiting gaza, showering the political recognition and money. amile an hour of qatar came. the foreign minister of egypt and foreign minister of turkey, and the arab league was there. hamas's stock on this one is rising, and, finally, hamas, again, driving their own narratives have withstood the military power of the middle east most preeminent military force. hamas on this one stands to win. if you add to that the possibility that the israelis may well begin to open up and ease some of the economic restrictions, hamas's legitimacy for the 1.5 million pa
of the last three weeks. one-and-a-half miles long. it's about the weight of a u.s. space station, and it's bigger than the weight of the empire state building. what we're looking at right now, around the clock 1800 garbage trucks have been moving in and out, bringing in debris. they have been going full tilt 247, even before the hurricane hit. well real looking at, they are using sand that was on the beach box that ended up from the flooding, using it as what are called berms to stop any hazardous waste from the losing end to the environment and the area, said that is the he -- the sand wall. they just switched on the lights they are looking at dump trucks and 18 wheeler's coming into my bringing in this debris. the president did you fly over when we were here this morning. he did give a shout out to the sanitation workers. they are the first responders that basically remove the debris. what we are hearing is the new york parks department gracefully open this up because if they did not build this landfill here, the rebuilt would have been even slower. right in the area, heartbreaking pho
a few months ago announced that the u.s. hase reduced its co2 emissions moresa than any other country in the world. a remarkable accomplishment. why? because of natural gas. clearly what i think will happen in the next ur years, the obama administration and the epe are going to continue imposing regulations on the coalposing industry, which will ad to more natural gas-fired generation capacity in the u.s. clearly also going to lead toclo aore coal exports from the united states. nt gerri: does not reducing we are using. here is with the national minin associatioln had to say. current administration policy virtually precludes the construction of nuclear calli based plants. necessary platform for the technology the president advocated. the same policies have skewed the market against call. theshave do you agree? >> i think that is clearly the case. think t you have a lot of haregulationsn are putting pulled behind the eightball.cool natural gas in many parts of thl country that is priced underuntt col. what is happening to back theu. u.s.ill be exporting moreexpog e cool, but the key po
is this being seen there? is it an egyptian-led agreement or one broker bide both egypt and the u.s.? >> reporter: this is really being seen as an egyptian-brokered keel. i mean, the president here, is the only person involved that is actually speaking to both sides because they have contact wgz the israelis through the security channeles, which they've had for years. and, also, they are in contact with hamas. hose me mubarak was not in touch with hamas. they wouldn't speak to him at all and often closed the side to journalists it. the difference is mursi was able to speak to hamas and exprl mediate the deal. that's really never been possible before. of course, without american influence, this would never have come to pass. they are, in speaking to egyptian officials and speaking to palestinian officiales, everybody here said we really need the americans to lean on israel and only when hillary clinton came to the region, did a deal come to fruition. >> and finally, just even in the next day or days, is it clear how this is enforced? it didn't seem to be in any language, other than s
. it was the lingering sense can he pull a fast one. it wasn't a u.s. official. in congress and american politics there were those on the right-wing who were saying, you know, this is our chance to get rid of this regime. how do we know they won't hide missiles in caves or something like that? so -- how did kennedy view khrushchev once he agreed to pull the miss thes out? did he begin to change the view with him someone >> guest: i'm not sure. i think it took awhile. we were talking before about verifying before trusting. trusting came gradually, again, once the surveillance flights were showing the soviets were following through. they were dismantling things. they started to realize, the sowf soviets and crew shove we can trust him. later on in the weeks later there are moments where trust really comes again. because the months we get -- once we get through the -- the end bookend of the missile crisis is traditionally the november 20th deal. >> host: the war teen ends. >> guest: the nature of the deal there are long-range bombers in cuba. there are three weeks of negotiation about are these or n
-fired power plants generating electricity in the u.s., and those plants produce 130 million tons of waste called coal ash. it contains concentrations of mercury, arsenic, lead, and other toxic materials. and as lesley stahl first reported in 2009, when coal ash is dumped into wet ponds--and there are more than 500 of those across the country-- the result can have an enormous health risk on the people living in nearby communities. >> we get about 48%, nearly half of the electricity in this country from coal. >> jim roewer is one of the top lobbyists for the power industry. >> coal is going to be around for a long time. >> and we really can't get rid of coal. >> we shouldn't get rid of coal. >> well, should or shouldn't, we can't, and coal makes waste. would you say that the industry has done a good job of disposing of the coal ash waste? >> we can do better. >> does that mean no? >> well, we had a kingston spill. >> that's kingston, tennessee, where, in december 2008, a giant retention pool of coal ash buckled under the weight of five decades of waste. >> all the power lines have been knoc
to make a comment, ask a question. go ahead and push your name tag up. the executive director of the u.s.a. folk all. talk to us a little bit about what you say football is doing in this area. before that come address the general question. is football serving the best interests of children in communities and how can it be improved? >> it is certainly striving for parents and kids. we all recognize this challenge is. we are at a point where we are learning. first i should think dr. cantu for raising this important issues. i believe we are all in this together. we're all looking ways to create a better for players. i hope we are and that is to provide accurate and whenever possible evidence-based data for appearance. we have to be careful certainly not to scare parents. my interaction with parents across the country as they are looking for frankly someone to say we care about your kids. we were taking action. we recognize challenges and were doing something about it. so virtually there's two sides as best as i can tell. there's a sports site in the football side and of course the science s
this year, the u.s. has given over $3 billion to them. >> america is investing and maintaining the peace in the region and also the american interests in the region. >> reporter: now, the u.s. has given money, albeit much less, about $200 million to the palestinians, but that money only goes to the palestinian authority in the west bank and not to gaza. elizabeth cook, cbs 5. >>> also in the news tonight, a manhole cover shot up out of the street in san francisco. smoke and sparks then shot out of the manhole on 11th and howard streets. it also happened just as the muni lines overhead started to arc. all this happening moments after crews responded to a traffic crash nearby. >>> one word about this next story. ,ew. an overflow of sewage and water. there was enough sewage to force a closure of the beach and a no swimming alert. >> we have a combined sewer system here, so we're collecting storm water and sewage in the same pipe. it only gets overwhelmed when you have a lot of rain. it's about 10% sewage. >> cleanup crews blocked off about a quarter mile stretch of the northernmost segment
diplomacy today. u.s. cemetery of state hillary clinton as well as the u.n. chief have been here. they will not talk to hamas, because hamas is considered by the u.s. and israel and much of the west as a terrorist organization. so, when you hear about the man who the egyptian president is negotiating with on behalf of israel, it's this man that i spoke to today. and we had a fiery exchange about civilian casualties, both in israel and in gaza and about why hamas won't recognize israel's right to exist. anyone looking for a sign that the arab spring has changed the middle east can find it here. the cease-fire would not have happened without this man. but for decades, he's bun one of israel's most hated enemies. they've tried to kill him and they consider him a terrorist. today, he was unapologetic for the actions that his group has taken. is it useful to kill civilians to create terror on civilians inside israel? >> translator: let me -- let me give you the proof. on the 8th of november, this month, the israelis entered gaza and killed a child. they bear the responsibility. we don
." across the u.s., non-profits need to expand their base of supporters. since 2006, the number of new doners giving to non-profits nationwide has dropped 14.6%, and there are fewer doners in general - down 5.3%. pritzker's strategy to pull together groups involves partnering with other non- profits on projects to meet a common goal. it's worked for other non-profits. now, it's pritzker's turn. "i think that as people realize that the funding pool is shared and donors are saying more and more, why don't you work together, i think it will become more evident." not all nonprofits are lucky enough to have a wealthy benefactor at the helm. non- profits having the toughest time in 2012 include animal welfare groups, health groups and international relief efforts. gold is a costly commodity that's valued everywhere but has particular cultural significance on the subcontinent of india. paul eggers files this story on the precious metal. while the sights outside this shop may seem foreign and the sign up top definitely is in another language, the merchandise inside, gold, is familiar to most e
to take you there live, and we'll check back later on. >>> it is 7:16. u.s. soldiers in afghanistan celebrated the thanksgiving holiday with a traditional turkey meal, and a game of rugby. about 60,000 u.s. troops are in afghanistan. spending thanksgiving away from their families, for many, this will be the last thanksgiving they're deployed in that country. >> this is the first thanksgiving game we've done, so we're excited about t we have a lot of participation from folks that normally don't play. so -- >> notice he's wearing a jets jersey they were doe natured by the jets -- donated by the jets. almost all troops are scheduled to withdraw by the end of 2014 when afghan forces will take over security. >>> woman from sacramento county is giving back in a big way. helping americans soldiers over seas. >> lot of toothbrushes, toothpaste. >> (has a son, serving now in afghanistan. he told her that the troops need things like baby wipes, and socks. she decided to collect the items for christmas care package, andd responses has been overwhelming. >> of the while many worry about eating
council on the non-discrimination act for the u.s. house of representatives. thank you for your time. >> thank you. >> eliot: new details on the mission that brought down osama bin laden. 15 succeeded in setting their houses on fire. at christmas, there was a lot of driving over the river and through the woods. and a little bit of skidding on the ice and taking out grandma's garage door. so while you're celebrating, allstate will be standing by. trouble never takes a holiday. neither should your insurance. that's allstate's stand. are you in good hands? ♪ ♪ before the sneeze, help protect with a spray. before the tissue, help defend with a wipe. before the cold & flu season help prevent with lysol. because when you have 10 times more protection with each hand wash... and kill 99.9% of germs around the house with each spray... those healthy habits start to add up. this season, a good offense is the best defense and lysol has your family covered because that's our mission for health. >> eliot: a culmination of years of what might be called a new kind of warfare. the
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